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Thursday, 17 September 2015 15:42

Glossophobia - Fear of Publc Speaking

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For many people having to speak in front of an audience represents their worst nightmare, in many surveys it comes as their number 1 or number 2 fear.

For some given the opportunity to deliver a eulogy at a funeral some people would sooner be in the coffin that up at the pulpit!

It holds people back regardless of how well they know their subject or how passionate they are about their hobbies/interests.

For some of course it is an integral part of their job, a part they treat with dread, and for which many are ill equipped.

Here are some fundamental tips many of which are obvious but are always worth following.

Even the top professionals learn something new all the time.

Hints & Tips

  1. Make sure you have everything you need for your presentation/speech. Props, digital devices which are charged and working and any other equipment you may need. If using a microphone, practise with it.
  2. Arrive early and setup in plenty of time. Nothing worse than being in a rush and flustered.
  3. Be prepared on your topic, if you do not know your subject well or have difficulty putting it across think of the audience and how they will react. What are the audience expecting, have you prepared to deliver it?
  4. Practise and practise again.
  5. Breath!! Before you begin pause, compose yourself and take a deep breath. This will also set the tone for your audience. Remember you don’t look as nervous as you feel.
  6. S L O W down and speak clearly. Most people, when delivering a speech speak much too quickly. Your audience should not need to work hard to understand you.
  7. Pause often. This is a very effective way to get the attention of your audience and also allows you to gather your thoughts if you lose your way.
  8. Stand up straight. Your body language communicates itself to your audience, command the space.
  9. Remember that only you will know if you made a mistake or fluffed your lines.
  10. Engage with your audience, welcome laughter and questions. Allow time for them. For some given the opportunity to deliver a eulogy at a funeral some people would sooner be in the coffin that up at the pulpit!
Read 1055 times Last modified on Thursday, 17 September 2015 16:36